North Carolina Immigration Attorney

Obtaining Other Non-Immigrant Visas

Aside from employment-based non-permanent resident visas, there are a number of other non-immigrant visas available. Whether you are a diplomat or a professional, a crewmember or an informant against terrorists, you may be able to obtain non-immigrant status in the United States. Consult with a North Carolina immigration lawyer from Robert Brown LLC today to learn whether any of the options below are available for your situation. You may also be eligible for a family-based visa or an employment-based visa.

Various Non-Immigrant Visas

A Visas
Diplomats and foreign government officials may apply for A-1 or A-2 visas, as well as their employees and immediate family members, on some occasions. In order to qualify, they must be travelling to the U.S. solely for diplomatic purposes on behalf of their national government.

C Visas
Known as "transit visa," C visas are required for individuals who must stop over in the United States during travel. This includes foreign passengers on cruise ships that make port in the U.S. with no intention of landing; crewmembers travelling to the U.S. as a passenger to join a ship or aircraft; and foreign travelers proceeding in immediate and continuous transit through the U.S. to or from the United Nations Headquarters District.

D Visas
These visas are available for crewmembers serving on board sea vessels and aircrafts in the United States. The crewmember must provide services required for normal operation of the vessel or aircraft. This includes being a trainee. In addition, the applicant does not have to be employed at the time of application; they must only be employed on the vessel or aircraft at the time they arrive in the U.S.

F-2 Visa
Spouses and dependent children of foreign students who are studying in the U.S. under F-1 visas may be granted an F-2 visa. This allows them to remain with their spouse or parent while the latter completes his or her studies in the United States.

G Visas
International Organization visas or NATO visas are issued to diplomats other than heads of state, who instead receive A visas. Employees of international organizations may apply for a G-1 visa for permanent mission members, a G-2 visas for representatives of a recognized government, a G-3 visa for representatives of non-recognized governments, or a G-4 visa for individuals who are proceeding to the U.S. to take up an appointment at a designated international organization.

M Visas
Students of vocational programs may apply for an M-1 visa to pursue their studies in the United States. They must first submit a SEVIS generated Form I-20 provided by their school to prove their eligibility, as well as an online Form DS-160 application, a passport, and one 2 × 2" photograph, all relative fees, and the SEVIS I-901 fee receipt.

S Visas
These visas are granted to individuals who have assisted law enforcement as a witness or informant. Only a federal or state law enforcement agency may request such non-immigrant visas on behalf of the witness or informant. The first step is to file Form I-854, Interagency Alien Witness and Informant Record. After this is approved, a Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status can be filed.

Why hire an attorney?

The most important step you can take when applying for an immigrant visa is to hire a competent immigration lawyer in North Carolina. Robert Brown LLC is a respected and experienced immigration law firm in North Carolina with the skill and knowledge to assist you through the process of applying for a non-immigrant visa. Call today to speak with an attorney and learn what your options are. We will provide you with quality counsel and excellent representation in any legal issues that may arise.

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